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Thread: USAF not F-35 thread

  1. #121
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    Shocking, the senate cuts money from the LRS-B to keep two programs the airforce does not need or want. In 2020, congress will be wondering why the new bomber project is behind schedule and over budget after years of cutting money at the front end of the program. SOS in Washington.

    http://breakingdefense.com/2015/05/s...nets-6-f-35bs/

  2. #122
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    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...esigns-412288/

    Lockheed not ditching agile fighter designs

    Lockheed Martin says it is too early to discount highly maneuverable fighter aircraft designs for future US Air Force and Navy warplanes, even as advances in long-range air-to-air missile technology makes dogfights less likely.

    According to the company’s director of advanced air dominance and unmanned systems strategy, Bob Ruszkowski, the US must be prepared to fight outnumbered, and air-to-air missiles can be countered.

    “In a situation where maybe there’s a numerical mismatch between the number of threat aircraft and the number of allied aircraft, there may be situations where dogfighting emerges, even as a secondary capability, but one you may have to resort to,” Ruszkowski tells Flightglobal. “Or, in situations where long-range missiles are negated by some other capabilities and now they’re rendered relatively ineffective. What bet are you going to make?”

    Some in Washington have argued that speed and agility should not automatically be key attributes of a sixth-generation combat aircraft, since those design attributes could be traded for greater size, range and payload. According to a report published in April by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, the lethality of a large combat aircraft "may be competitive or even superior to more traditional fighter aircraft designs".

    “We're at a point where it's time to think long-term, and hard, about what attributes we want and need and make everything earn its way onto the platform,” the report's author John Stillion said at an Air Force Association event last month. “Don't just assume it's going to be fast and agile.”

    Ruszkowski agrees that a larger combat jet might be preferred in the future, but it’s too early to tell.

    “I don’t believe anybody has defined what those attributes are,” he says, while noting that the Vietnam War-era McDonnell Douglas F-4 was delivered without a gun, but one had to be installed later as a “fallback capability” because air-to-air missiles of the day proved to be less effective in combat than imagined.

    “They needed a fallback capability,” he says.

    Lockheed has been exploring sixth-generation aircraft capabilities and designs in earnest since 2009, and Ruszkowski says the company is looking for high-payoff technologies to invest in.

    He thinks assured communications with satellites and other aircraft will be essential, and next-generation weapons will be a “discriminating” factor on any future air dominance platform. To that end, the company is investing heavily in hypersonic air vehicles laser weapons.

    Last year, the company demonstrated a new beam control turret for an airborne laser, conducting eight flight tests in a surrogate aircraft over Michigan. Lockheed is also exploring the propulsion, materials and sensor technologies needed to develop an air-launched hypersonic missile.

    “They’re not only applicable for next-generation air dominance platforms, but they’re applicable for current-generation platforms,” Ruszkowski says.

    The navy is looking to replace its Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornets in the late 2020s. The air force wants to develop a truly next-generation platform through its Air Dominance 2030 initiative.

  3. #123
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    The Pentagon has given Milestone C approval to Raytheon’s Small Diameter Bomb II programme, moving the tri-mode seeker weapon to production and deployment with the US Air Force on the F-15E Strike Eagle.

    ...

    “The program was a Milestone B in the summer of 2010,” he says, referring to the point when a military programme enters the development and testing phase. “The goal of the cost per weapon was about $180,000. It’s coming in at about $115,000.”

    The air force has already started integrating the weapon with its first aircraft, the F-15 Strike Eagle. The Navy plans to integrate it first with the F/A-18 Super Hornet and then with its threshold aircraft, the F-35C and F-35B Joint Strike Fighters.

    Raytheon’s tri-mode seeker allows the bomb to hit fixed and moving targets on land and at sea through poor weather conditions with pinpoint accuracy.
    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...uction-412401/


    That is a pretty darn impressive price per bomb for something as sophisticated as the SDB-II, less than half the cost of an AASM and with a lot more capability.

  4. #124
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    Cue the star wars soundtrack, laser tested on fighter sized aircraft by 2022:

    http://breakingdefense.com/2015/05/l...watts-by-2022/

  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBW View Post
    Cue the star wars soundtrack, laser tested on fighter sized aircraft by 2022:

    http://breakingdefense.com/2015/05/l...watts-by-2022/
    Quote Originally Posted by bring_it_on View Post
    I may not be around in 2050, but I believe you'll see some activity in Directed energy weapons for tactical platforms very soon. How soon? My guess would be that we'd get some sort of "technology demonstration" roadmap by 2017. This does not mean that there isn't internal activity happening at the moment (its well documented), it just means that in my opinion we'll get to hear of a more formal demonstration roadmap in a couple of years.
    http://forum.keypublishing.com/showt...-fighter/page2

    Give them 12-24 months and we will get to hear a lot more on what the roadmap is and also on what the platform is and how they expect to transition. . It isn't as much about identifying the roadmap (which they have ) but communicating it to the public (which should follow over the next year or two).
    Last edited by bring_it_on; 18th May 2015 at 22:39.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

  6. #126
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    More from the article:



    What can 100-plus kilowatts kill? Hardy was cagey about specific targets, but a study from the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments suggests that it could destroy enemy cruise missiles, drones, and even manned aircraft at significant ranges.

    “A 150-200 kW laser could be capable against surface-to-air and air-to-air missiles,” said CSBA’s Mark Gunzinger, the report’s author. And against manned aircraft? “Quite probably,” he said, “especially at altitude where the air is thinner.”


  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBW View Post
    Cue the star wars soundtrack, laser tested on fighter sized aircraft by 2022:

    http://breakingdefense.com/2015/05/l...watts-by-2022/
    Ok, so a real life laser weapon may enter testing in well less than 10 years and people here have nothing to say...

    Meanwhile the troll wars fill several pages a day.

  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopsalot View Post
    Ok, so a real life laser weapon may enter testing in well less than 10 years and people here have nothing to say...

    Meanwhile the troll wars fill several pages a day.
    Well, you could always start a thread called "US jets to fry Euro-canards"

  9. #129
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    It'll could be useful against AAMs too. Against aircraft? Possibly at close range and the ability to direct the shot rather than firing straight ahead would give more flexibility than guns, even if the damage is slower.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by bring_it_on View Post
    Yeah they carry them..Here's the SG carrying
    Thanks, but I know about F-15s that are not E models carrying X Sidewinders.
    ...so, any pics/vids of F-15Es with X winders?
    How can less be more? It's impossible. More is more.
    Yngwie Malmsteen

  11. #131
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    There probably are..too lazy to look for them though. From what I understand, all types can deploy the 9X and the USAF has its fair share of missiles by now.
    Last edited by bring_it_on; 20th May 2015 at 01:20.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

  12. #132
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  13. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by bring_it_on View Post
    There probably are..too lazy to look for them though. From what I understand, all types can deploy the 9X and the USAF has its fair share of missiles by now.
    Can F-22 deploy AIM-9X?

  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSphere View Post
    Can F-22 deploy AIM-9X?
    First test occurred this year. To be operational with the F-22 by 2017. No contract for the HMDS as yet though, the air force is still shopping around for solutions.
    Last edited by Vnomad; 20th May 2015 at 21:55.

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSphere View Post
    Can F-22 deploy AIM-9X?
    The first 2 guided Aim-9x shots were fired in February of this year. The fleet will get it with Increment 3.2 (iirc) around 2017. I guess all platforms accept the Raptor (that are operational) can fire the 9X as of now, with the raptor integration happening right now, with hardware modification contracts being awarded in 2014.

    Last edited by bring_it_on; 20th May 2015 at 21:55.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

  16. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSphere View Post
    Can F-22 deploy AIM-9X?
    No.
    http://www.edwards.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123447344
    http://www.janes.com/article/51375/f...ewinder-firing
    Note they are planning to modify only 220 launchers ie 110 AIM-9X capable and available Raptors.
    How can less be more? It's impossible. More is more.
    Yngwie Malmsteen

  17. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by eagle View Post
    Note they are planning to modify only 220 launchers ie 110 AIM-9X capable and available Raptors.
    We don't know that for a fact. Perhaps the later lots of F-22s were equipped with updated launchers but never fitted with the Aim-9X. Doesn't make sense for the DoD to spend billions developing the aircraft and then try to save a meagre $13-14 million ($300K each) by cutting corners at this stage.

  18. #138
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    There are around 123 Combat coded F-22A's. The 110 number is either due to the reason mentioned above, or most likely due to the fact that they could fund that amount for now (this is most likely for full inc. 3.2) and may later issue a follow on contract to bring the remaining aircraft back to standard. The USAF has 123 combat coded F-22A's, with another 20 in the back up inventory. The rest are used for tactics and testing.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

  19. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by bring_it_on View Post
    There are around 123 Combat coded F-22A's. The 110 number is either due to the reason mentioned above, or most likely due to the fact that they could fund that amount for now (this is most likely for full inc. 3.2) and may later issue a follow on contract to bring the remaining aircraft back to standard. The USAF has 123 combat coded F-22A's, with another 20 in the back up inventory. The rest are used for tactics and testing.
    Quite right, there are 143 Raptors included in the Block 35 increment 3 plans. The older Raptors are simply too expensive to retrofit to the block 35 standard. The 36 (35 after the write off) are used for training, the rest for test and the weapons squadron. Not too sure about the Aim-9x only being implemented on 110 Raptors, unless they don't plan on fitting the ANG squadron in Hawaii with the Aim-9X.

  20. #140
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    Has there been studies to integrate the F-35's HMD on the F-22? The HMD could display the video stream coming from the MLD sensors and give the F-22 better night/day SA and a 360deg capability. The MLD has a lower definition than the DAS but I would guess it is still good enough to warn the pilot of incoming threats.

  21. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotshot View Post
    Has there been studies to integrate the F-35's HMD on the F-22? The HMD could display the video stream coming from the MLD sensors and give the F-22 better night/day SA and a 360deg capability. The MLD has a lower definition than the DAS but I would guess it is still good enough to warn the pilot of incoming threats.
    No, it is too bulky and if you look at the seat on the F-35, you can see that it has a large and wide headrest to help support that thing. Using the MLD like DAS is feasible and LM has claimed that it has that capability. It would require some extensive software mods(not easy with the Raptor), however. The new helmet study does mention that very possibility though:
    The air force also wants a helmet that overlays display imagery over an external field of view generated by a camera.
    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...r-f-22-410575/

    The Scorpion HMD has been floated one possible option, was shelved, and has re-emerged as the leading contender to be integrated:
    http://www.gentexcorp.com/scorpion-h...-cueing-system

  22. #142
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    The raptor drivers are likely to go for the cheapest solution that meets their needs. Its either the Scorpion or the JHMCSII. The ACC has already purchased th Scorpion for the A-10 iirc and they have evaluated it for the Raptor as well.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

  23. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBW View Post
    No, it is too bulky and if you look at the seat on the F-35, you can see that it has a large and wide headrest to help support that thing. Using the MLD like DAS is feasible and LM has claimed that it has that capability. It would require some extensive software mods(not easy with the Raptor), however. The new helmet study does mention that very possibility though:

    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...r-f-22-410575/

    The Scorpion HMD has been floated one possible option, was shelved, and has re-emerged as the leading contender to be integrated:
    http://www.gentexcorp.com/scorpion-h...-cueing-system
    If the scorpion can do the trick they'll probably chose it, even though it is less capable than the F-35's helmet. It should have the ability to tell the pilot where to look when the MLD has detected a threat. I doubt it would be that hard to display an icon on the visor when the MLD detects a target in a certain direction.

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    They need one that can capitalize on the MLD capabilities.

  25. #145
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    HELLADS Milestone

    Hellads Laser Completes Development


    SAN DIEGO – 21 May 2015 – General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA ASI), a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions, today announced that the High-Energy Liquid Laser (HELLADS) completed the U.S. Government Acceptance Test Procedure and is now being shipped to the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico. At WSMR, the laser will undergo an extensive series of live fire tests against a number of military targets.

    The HELLADS Demonstrator Laser Weapon System (DLWS) is designed to demonstrate the efficacy of a tactical laser weapon in counter-Rocket, Artillery, and Mortar (CRAM), counter-Air and counter-Missile applications, as well as a number of special applications. The 150 kW Class HELLADS laser has been developed over a number of years to create a completely new approach to electrically-powered lasers with sufficiently low size, weight, and power consumption to enable deployment on a number of tactical platforms.

    “HELLADS represents a new generation of tactical weapon systems with the potential to revolutionize sovereign defenses and provide a significant tactical advantage to our war- fighters,” said Linden Blue, CEO, GA-ASI. “It is remarkable to see high-power laser technology mature into an extremely compact weapons system and be deployed for field tests. It will be even more remarkable to witness the impact that this will have on U.S. Defense capability.”

    The HELLADS laser was developed through a series of stage/gate phases beginning with a physics demonstration and progressing through a series of laser demonstrators at increasing power levels. At each stage, DARPA required beam quality, laser power, efficiency, size, and weight objectives to be demonstrated. The program also developed the world’s highest brightness laser diodes, compact battery storage, and thermal storage systems, and improved the manufacturing process and size of specialized laser materials and optics.

    The HELLADS DLWS holds the world’s record for the highest laser output power of any electrically-powered laser. Dr. Michael Perry, vice president of Laser and Electro-Optic Systems for GA-ASI, credits DARPA with a unique capability to foster, nurture, and support such a development.

    “The HELLADS team of program managers, technical support, and DARPA senior management has worked to address the challenges of developing a completely new technology. Additionally, if it were not for the hard work of our scientists and engineers, we could not have succeeded.”

    “This is the most challenging program that I have been associated with,” said David Friend, HELLADS Program Manager, GA-ASI. “This program has advanced the state-of-the-art in so many areas.”

    The pioneering HELLADS DLWS represents the first generation of the technology. Through other U.S. Government programs separate from the DARPA-supported work, GA-ASI has demonstrated, second and third Generation versions of the technology which significantly increase the efficiency and reduce the size, weight, and power consumption for the system while increasing the beam quality. The third Generation system is currently being incorporated into a Tactical Laser Weapon Module designed for integration into both manned and unmanned aircraft systems.

    “Even as we begin development of the fourth Generation system, I am looking forward to seeing HELLADS perform in the live fire tests,” said Dr. Perry. “The laser technology is a means to an end. What matters is the new and cost-effective capability that we can bring to our country.”
    Last edited by bring_it_on; 27th May 2015 at 21:32.
    Old radar types never die; they just phased array

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  27. #147
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    Anyone know what the future holds for the F-15 inventory of the 142nd Fighter Wing (out of Portland, Oregon) ?
    http://img818.imageshack.us/img818/9098/rsz11rsz3807.jpg

  28. #148
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    JSTARS recapitalization proposals were submitted to USAF today. If USAF holds true to form, they will announce a winner in February or March '16.

  29. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR1 View Post
    Anyone know what the future holds for the F-15 inventory of the 142nd Fighter Wing (out of Portland, Oregon) ?
    Currently part of the squadron is in Europe. Oregon ANG was slated to lose some of its F-15 inventory ( 123rd or 142nd or both) with the planned cut to roughly 179 (moving target) birds.

    Currently the procurement plans don't even have all those, previously known as "golden eagles" getting APG-63 (v3) and epawss for quite some time. With 60+ already having the AESA.

    There will have to be some consolidation and cuts besides the Lakenheath squadron, which was supposed to stand down soon and will definately go when the F-35 beds down there in the '20's. Obviously, the recent events in Europe may save some F-15 units and numbers near term.

  30. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBW View Post
    Currently part of the squadron is in Europe. Oregon ANG was slated to lose some of its F-15 inventory ( 123rd or 142nd or both) with the planned cut to roughly 179 (moving target) birds.

    Currently the procurement plans don't even have all those, previously known as "golden eagles" getting APG-63 (v3) and epawss for quite some time. With 60+ already having the AESA.

    There will have to be some consolidation and cuts besides the Lakenheath squadron, which was supposed to stand down soon and will definately go when the F-35 beds down there in the '20's. Obviously, the recent events in Europe may save some F-15 units and numbers near term.
    According to AFMs April issue, Klamath Falls 173 FW is about to gain 9 Eagles. California ANG 144 FW, Florida ANG 125 FW, Louisiana ANG 159 FW, Massachusetts ANG 104 FW are to get 2 more Eagles each. 142 FW isn't mentioned. But if I had to guess, they will lose the F-15. Aside from being the only unmentioned F-15 ANG wing, Portland IAP is more crowded than Klamath Falls, which is also the F-15C training base. I think that one will stay for quite some time.
    How can less be more? It's impossible. More is more.
    Yngwie Malmsteen

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