Key.Aero Network
Register Free

Page 20 of 20 FirstFirst ... 101617181920
Results 571 to 598 of 598

Thread: Missing Malaysian Airlines B777

  1. #571
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Sorry if I might have looked extatic with this. Not my intention. As written two years ago, there are few hypothesis that match the fact here. Decompression is a fairly well known potential occurence and most crew are well trained for this (see the recent 737 engine failure with a breach of fuselage) and battery runaway that would incapacitate an entire airplane for 9 long hours request a fairly high volume of this (see presumably the 777 from BA with passengers incomadated and vomitting).

    I checked the link and it is ok. Click on the text in BOLD. I try generally in my "Source" chapter to link to the main page of the website.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 29th August 2016 at 15:46.

  2. #572
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    ABJ-LBV-JNB-DBN
    Posts
    2,628
    OK I found the story. As I said, funny there are no barnacles on that wreckage. Did the person who found it clean it off?
    http://forum.keypublishing.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24455&dateline=137163  6822Hindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

  3. #573
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    There are barnacles found so far only on the flaperon discovered on the Fr island.
    This part is still on hold by the Fr investigation team (scroll back). I will be surprised if amateur specifically searching for parts related to this incident are unaware that you don't alter crime evidences.

    Most discovered parts were so far from inhabited shores.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 15th September 2016 at 21:22. Reason: language

  4. #574
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Barnacles did grow in warmer waters

    However Fr parallel study does not yield exactly the same conclusion
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 30th August 2016 at 20:51.

  5. #575
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Austrlia to pursue with the search.


    search that has so far cost[ed] $180 million and that was expected to end this summer could now be extended into next year. This will be encouraging news for the families of the passengers and crew on the flight who feared that the search was being prematurely curtailed.
    Seems some sonar contact need more attention

    Source:
    The Daily Beast.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 2nd September 2016 at 17:07.

  6. #576
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Pictures of the parts found in Mozambique

    Two of them found separately by the son of a EU diplomat.

    Source:
    The daily mail.co.uk

  7. #577
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Recovered in Madagascar, burnt internal panels raise other possibilities, including cascading failures after a flash fire


    The new pieces, to be given to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau in Canberra today, are non-structural and appear to be sections of an internal wall panel which has been burnt, quite likely by a flash fire.

    They strongly resemble some of the the panelling used in the Boeing 777 avionics bay, which is located below and behind the cockpit under the main cabin floor.
    The pictures can be seen here: http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel...fb81d27e6cd252

    It increased after Malaysian authorities revealed the plane had been transporting a large amount of potentially flammable lithium batteries in its cargo.
    By the way, I would like to be clear here: to my knowledge, we were the firsts to publicly discuss and come around a plausible battery theory here.

    Source:
    Yahoo News Australia via The West Australian
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 12th September 2016 at 21:52.

  8. #578
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    In the hands of the ATSB

    the ATSB has today received debris from Mr Gibson and are seeking advice from Malaysian authorities regarding how they would like to proceed,” a spokesman told news.com.au.
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 12th September 2016 at 21:38.

  9. #579
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Tanzania debris "part of the missing plane"


    the inboard section of the right, outboard flap of the plane, was recovered in June. [...]
    The part numbers and a date stamp on the piece, recovered on Pemba island, helped the investigation.

    In addition to the Boeing part number, the report said, the identification stamps had an "OL" number, both unique identifiers to part construction.

    The Italian part manufacturer then recovered build records for those numbers, confirming that they belonged to the missing plane.
    .
    However, in contrary to what is written in the press, I am on the opinion that a ctrled crash landing by an hypothetical pilot in ctrl won't have seen Flap extended if that one was to be experienced. I have already posted crash at sea recommended procedures long ago here, specifically dealing with that hypothesis.

    So there are not such conclusion to expect from this. The only thing certain WOULD be that a controlled descent (ascertained by the extended position of the flap) was done by an Inexperienced pilot. This would be a revolutionary conclusion by itself but still inline with the theory of an incapacitated flight crew and unknown numbers of survivors.

    Source:
    The BBC.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 15th September 2016 at 21:34.

  10. #580
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Keighley, West Yorks
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by TomcatViP View Post
    So there are not such conclusion to expect from this. The only thing certain WOULD be that a controlled descent (ascertained by the extended position of the flap) was done by an Inexperienced pilot. This would be a revolutionary conclusion by itself but still inline with the theory of an incapacitated flight crew and unknown numbers of survivors.
    An interesting idea, but it would have to be a pretty experienced pilot to be able to know how to operate the flaps. I'm assuming that by now, if any other passengers on board had flying experience, it would have been flagged up - certainly back when it was thought the plane had been hijacked. It could have been a flight attendant perhaps - I know if I had that role I would learn how to land a plane in an emergency. If they could do that, however, surely they could have been able to change the flight path and head for land, rather than into the middle of nowhere.

    The recent discovery of burned parts and mention of batteries is also interesting, but any fire bad enough to damage the fuselage would have surely downed the plane far earlier than its apparent fuel-expiry crash. I would suspect this damage was caused in the crash or even afterwards (suggestion on one news source, they might have been burned on a beach bonfire by locals).

  11. #581
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    239 ppl died when MH370 plunged into sea (at max). It is dubious than none of them knew how a plane operates in general (hobby, professionally related, TV series, book etc...). Then Flap lever are easily identifiable on a Boeing aircraft.
    Note that I don't expect this hypothesis. I just mentioned that possibility.

    The absence of soot and polymers retraction rather clearly identifies a flash fire* as was noted earlier. But you are right, we must step cautiously.

    *if any... (late edit)
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 23rd September 2016 at 01:30.

  12. #582
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    ABJ-LBV-JNB-DBN
    Posts
    2,628
    There just isn't enough debris to draw any conclusions yet, except that it looks like the plane did break up. I'm looking at this midair collision in which there was limited structural damage, the plane continued flying on autopilot indicating that the crew may have passed out from depressurization. Perhaps the E&E compartment door of MH370 blew off damaging the transponder equipment, and the crew were lax resulting in their incapacitation, but it doesn't explain why MH370 turned off course. And why no debris was spotted in satellite pictures well that many volunteers reviewed thousands of satellite pictures taken shortly afterwards. Also, the damage to the various parts is not consistent.
    http://forum.keypublishing.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24455&dateline=137163  6822Hindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

  13. #583
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Excellent potential scenario. But Germanwings crash fits more the equation (no turn and straight-in dive regulated by Mach limiter - here the 125 seems to have run out of fuel).*

    However, the fuselage breach could have induce similar effects.
    My own idea was the battery runway gases inducing gradual incapacitation with legs last body part affected (I provided a source). It seemed to me that a pilot would attempt a rudder turn (AP has a wing level mode) before passing away.

    Notice that some spotted the rear emergency door in some photo but no confirmation came denying de facto this hypo (pic might be on this thread).

    In any way, as written at the time, we have to understand that there is a strong possibility that some passengers did survive the initial event and, logically, as horrid as it is to figure, the last ones probably dying in the final crash.


    *Germanwings flight did cross an UCAV fly testing zone and DID have its alt set wrongly on the transponder by 200ft
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 17th September 2016 at 23:58.

  14. #584
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Fife, Scotland
    Posts
    11,220
    I doubt this was a decompression event. The aircraft turned left and then circled over the Captain's neighbourhood then turned in a few directions before eventually heading south. There is no waypoint new the neighbourhood, so there was nowhere to set the plane to fly to or for the plane to reach and "hold" over. Also, the plane would not just decide on its own to leave the hold fly a few turns, then head south. To many experts and myself, this indicates someone was at the controls.

    Same can be said for incapacitation via a battery runaway.

    Why is it, that ever since the first 787 event, everyone seems to think all Boeings are prone to such an event? The scenario is always brought up as a possible explanation when something happens to a Boeing. The 777 uses different technology and is not as reliant on batteries as the 787 for emergency flight control. Thats what the RAT is for. Even so, a battery runaway does not fit with the plane making controlled flight manoeuvres as observed on military radar.


    I think we're all trying too hard to shift the blame from the more likely culprit: One or both of the pilots.

    I am the first to defend pilots in any circumstance until investigations show exactly what happened. I did so in this case to.
    However, as more information on the aircraft's movements post loss of contact emerged and were verified, I had to admit this looks very much like a pilot event.
    Lets face it, this is not the first time a pilot has taken the controls and done something to the aircraft because they wanted to end it all. The now infamous Germanwings flight was not the first either. It also wasn't long ago a pilot hijacked his own plane and landed.
    Bmused55

    Keep thy airspeed up, less the earth come from below and smite thee.

    My Blog
    My Designs

  15. #585
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    ATSB last report cast doubt on fire theory


    The ATSB said in its report on the two pieces recovered near Sainte Luce on the south-east coast of Madagascar, that a dark grey colouration on most of both sides of the items were due to "an applied resin and was not the result of exposure to heat or fire".

    The larger piece had three small marks "resulting from localised heating", but there was "no evidence of overall gross heat damage".

    "The origin and age of these marks was not apparent," the ATSB added


    There were three small marks on one fragment that smelt burnt - but the heat damage appeared to be recent and a result of "localised heating", the ATSB added.
    “It was considered that burning odors would generally dissipate after an extended period of environmental exposure, including salt water immersion, as expected for items originating from” the missing plane, the statement said.


    "At this stage it is not possible to determine whether the debris is from MH370 or indeed even a Boeing 777.
    The liquid like burnt mark is then assessed as the result of a resin (inner filler or glue) darkened with time and exposure.



    Source:
    ABC.net.au
    The BBC.com
    CBS News.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 23rd September 2016 at 01:58.

  16. #586
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    List of identified debris updated


    Five items, found from late 2015 to early 2016, are categorised as having “almost certainly” originated from the lost aircraft: a right-wing flap track fairing; a piece of a right horizontal stabilizer panel; an engine nose cowl; the door R1 stowage closet; and a cabin interior panel.
    [...]
    Items under evaluation include a right hand engine fan cowling, a wing trailing edge panel, and a seat back panel from an aircraft’s in-flight entertainment system.
    [...]

    the list excludes two pieces of debris recently found on a beach in Madagascar by private searcher Blaine Gibson. In early October [...].
    The two glassfibre honeycomb pieces of debris do not bear any identifying marks that would confirm they come from a Boeing 777-200ER, says the ATSB.
    Source:
    FlightGlobal.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 23rd October 2016 at 06:08.

  17. #587
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    ATSB last report (download link)

  18. #588
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328

  19. #589
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Experts define additional MH370 search area

    Initially, satellite data suggested the aircraft was in ‘constant true track’ or ‘lateral navigation’ (LNAV). These modes would have favoured the southern end of the search area, but since these areas have been searched without finding the aircraft, other control modes indicating that the aircraft is in the northern portion of the search zone are now favoured.

    “During the first principles review meeting, flight crew with extensive experience on the aircraft type indicated that the aircraft is usually flown in the LNAV or CMH (constant magnetic heading) lateral control modes. This information, combined with the results from the areas already searched, increase the likelihood in the northern section of the probability map.”

    In addition, drift analysis of aircraft debris that washed up on the western edge of the Indian ocean also points to a more northern search area. Overlaying this with satellite communications data helped determine the possible new search area.
    Source:
    FlightGlobal.com

  20. #590
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    No suspicions of crew, passengers, says French probe

    The investigators and three examining magistrates met with relatives of the four on Thursday to brief them on progress.

    The relatives were told that background checks on passengers and crew by France's domestic intelligence agency, the DGSI, "turned up negative," according to sources close to the inquiry.
    Source:
    The Agence France Presse.com

  21. #591
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    ABJ-LBV-JNB-DBN
    Posts
    2,628
    Thanks for the updates!
    http://forum.keypublishing.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24455&dateline=137163  6822Hindsight is what you see from the tailgunner's position...

  22. #592
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    @27Vet: u'r wc

    [...]China must step up in search for MH370

    The cost of the search is unclear but analysts believe it is about $190 million. Malaysia has paid $100 million, Australia $70 million and China $20 million.
    China’s contribution has been pitiful given MH370 was a code-share with China Southern Airlines and carried the airline’s flight number CZ748. There were 153 Chinese on board. China needs to contribute more.
    The hollow rhetoric of Malaysian Transport Minister Liow Tong Lai saying it is an “aspirational goal” to find MH370 simply is not good enough.
    Even Australian Transport Minister Darren Chester’s excuse that the new area of 25,000sqkm was not specific enough to meet the criteria set down by officials from the three governments is lame.
    In the vastness of the Indian Ocean, an area of 25,000sqkm is very specific and the analysis that has helped pinpoint the new area has broken new ground.
    It's true that China has been constantly behind its obligations. We did mention this fact here early.

    Every bit of information gleaned and detailed pieces of evidences found have constantly comforted the reflection around what could have happened, converging always around an hypothesis that only needed slight adjustments and even finding its way through new regulations. Beyond the mourning of families, it is important to close this chapter with hard evidences in order to ensure that this reflection will not be lost in an ocean of doubts [/IRONY] or a sea of rhetoric, leading to zero improvements and yet to be expected another similar disaster. This is all about a technical inquiry and the ATSB has proved itself exemplary.

    In the vastness of the Indian Ocean, an area of 25,000sqkm is very specific and the analysis that has helped pinpoint the new area has broken new ground.[...]
    Now that we have new facts, including a drift study by the CSIRO [...], the search must go on.
    ------------------
    Also (last week):
    On Friday, Dutch-owned vessel Equator reportedly raced to an area in the southern Indian Ocean recently identified as being a more likely location for the plane's debris. It pushed further north on Saturday before tracking back slightly.
    [...] "After its run north, Equator has now tracked back south-west at high speed to a point at 35.3 degrees south where it seems that the [autonomous underwater vehicle] is deployed again."
    Sources:
    The West.com.au
    The Week.co.UK
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 15th January 2017 at 05:17.

  23. #593
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,945

  24. #594
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Oceanographic analysis offers potential crash site of MH370

    The analysis showed that it would take six months to one year for the drifters to reach western Australia and one-and-a half to two years to reach eastern Africa. Interestingly, two drifters traveled from the search region to the area of Reunion Island during the period between the crash of flight MH370 and when the airplane flaperon was found.

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-oceano...mh370.html#jCp
    368 undrogued surface drifter were used that map the entire probability zone.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tjoo_a_1248149_f0001_c.jpeg 
Views:	79 
Size:	143.6 KB 
ID:	251099
    a subset of 97 drifters from that group (red trajectories) that eventually reached the purple box, which surrounds Reunion Island.
    Launch location of those drifter can define a corresponding crash probability zone that match the other results
    2 ended up of La Réunion's shores.

    Two of them (thick black trajectories in Figure 1) reached the purple box in July and November of 2014. Remarkably, one of them (thick red trajectory in Figure 1) reached the purple box in July 2015, the same month that debris from flight MH370 washed ashore on Reunion Island.
    airplane debris [were] found on Reunion Island, backtracking the positions of the 375 surface drifters that travelled within the purple box during the last 25 years may also help identify the possible initial location of the debris.
    In other words, it is hardly believable that so few debrit ended-up in the hands of the Fr authority without implementing the astounishing local policy to harshly pay non state-worker to burn everything they found on the beach at night, something, as said much earlier, that stands out of any Fr law or usage. I will remind you that the comedy around the evacuation of Journalists and media at the time arguing that the nearby volcano will soon erupts adds to the lack of understanding (I posted at the time the volcano activity, eruption policy that are very codified and don't generally englobe the zone were the debrits were found and does not imply overflight like it was bluntly said in front of the media.

    It is clear enough today that, If China and Malaysia does not restart the search, MH370 could slowly end-up being... a French embarrassment.


    You can browse up to found all the arguments that were put at the time.






    Source:
    University of Miami via phys.org

    Report
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 24th February 2017 at 05:13.

  25. #595
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Possible Flap track fairing (with barnacles) washed ashore on the east cost of South Africa


    "This morning, a local person found some items that washed up on a beach on the Transkei coast near East London that looked like they could be from an aircraft. They sent the cell phone pics taken of these parts to one of our local aviators and the pics have been sent to our local [air traffic control] who will circulate them and notify the relevant authorities," Onions wrote.

    Source:
    The Christian Post
    http://www.avcom.co.za/
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 4th February 2017 at 06:58.

  26. #596
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Third anniversary of the tragedy today

    Jeanette Maguire, sister of passenger Catherine Lawton (NZ), said the relatives appreciated that the Australian government had invited them to such a memorial service.

    “The government didn’t have to do that and it was very special that they wanted to do something to ensure our families didn’t feel forgotten,” Maguire said.
    Link

    On keypub forum, that day:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MH370_KeyPub140308.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	83.5 KB 
ID:	251834

    And what has been found today (source CNN):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	170308125546-gfx-mh370-debris-found-exlarge-169.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	63.8 KB 
ID:	251868
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 11th March 2017 at 06:09.

  27. #597
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    415
    I see the pilot's union, BALPA, has renewed its call for better aircraft tracking...
    http://www.airportsinternational.com...tracking/18609

  28. #598
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    "Where the fruit is"
    Posts
    4,328
    Also, an incident related to Lithium Batteries: embedded headphone battery exploded in flight
    .
    Notice how a small battery indisposed a large part of the cabin passengers with smokes and fumes.
    MH370 cargo bay was filled with 2t of electronic products including Li-ion batteries as we have detailed it earlier.

    Source:
    USA Today.com
    Last edited by TomcatViP; 15th March 2017 at 21:17.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

- Part of the    Network -

KEY AERO AVIATION NEWS

MAGAZINES

AVIATION FORUM

SHOP

 

WEBSITES