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Thread: Was 1940 really like this?

  1. #1
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    Was 1940 really like this?

    Hi,

    Here at the RAF Benevolent Fund we’ve launched a special webiste to bring the Battle of Britain alive for a new generation - and it would be great to get your comments on the site.

    www.1940chronicle.com is a new online 1940s style newspaper which breaks daily news of Britain at war from the same day 70 years ago, as though it’s happening in real time.

    Interwoven with this are the stories of five fictional but historically accurate characters: a Hurricane Pilot based at Biggin Hill, a Radar Operator, a Plane Mechanic, a Nurse and a Journalist. Their personal accounts of the Battle unfold in real time against the backdrop of the war through a series of blogs. They're also on Facebook and Twitter.

    We would really like to know what you think about the site. Is it historically accurate? Do the characters ring true? Please visit, explore and give us any comments you have here on the forum, it would be great to get opinions from Aviation Forum members.

    Thanks for your time

  2. #2
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    Thumbs up

    As a father with a 10 year old son that has spent a lot of time in Museums etc talking about 20th centrury history I have to say I like it.


    It is "alive" and gives the younger generation something tactile to feed from, there have been many debates on the forum about sterile musuems and AV displays etc, my own view is that to help the younger generation learn and appreciate the past, then the methods and content need to move along as well.

    I like it and I'll go over it with my son tomorrow.
    You can teach monkies to fly better than that....

  3. #3
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    @1940George: Exhausted this morning after night with @1940Jane. Glad I'm not on dawn patrol today!

    1 day ago

    Un-bloody-believable.......
    Under my gruff exterior lies an even gruffer interior...

    行雲流水

    Warbirdskies Blog

  4. #4
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    Wish I was Jane Sheridan.....................

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all your comments - please do keep them coming, it's really useful to get your thoughts!

  6. #6
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    Pleased you like it BSg-75!

    Quote Originally Posted by BSG-75 View Post
    As a father with a 10 year old son that has spent a lot of time in Museums etc talking about 20th centrury history I have to say I like it.


    It is "alive" and gives the younger generation something tactile to feed from, there have been many debates on the forum about sterile musuems and AV displays etc, my own view is that to help the younger generation learn and appreciate the past, then the methods and content need to move along as well.

    I like it and I'll go over it with my son tomorrow.

  7. #7
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    HI,

    Interesting side article in today's 1940chronicle about American claims of a British secret weapon against the Luftwaffe. Have any Aviation Forum readers ever heard of these claims?

    http://www.1940chronicle.com/

  8. #8
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    Very much so.

    Parachute and Cable (PAC) Possibly sometimes known as Z Batteries.

    As you would deduce from the fact little was heard of it they weren't particularly successful.

    Used extensively on merchant ships, again with little effect

    Moggy
    Last edited by Moggy C; 13th August 2010 at 12:29.
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

  9. #9
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    I seem to recall them mentioned in a couple of books and that one allegedly brought a plane down, though this might have already received damage from the defences, don't have the books to hand at the moment annoyingly
    Push enough pixels around and it'll look like an aeroplane profile.

  10. #10
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    I have the same feeling

    Epr 210 and the raid on Woolston come to mind

    Moggy
    "What you must remember" Flip said "is that nine-tenths of Cattermole's charm lies beneath the surface." Many agreed.

  11. #11
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    I wonder what Tim makes of all this, after all he was there at the time.

    Peter

  12. #12
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    Hi all, thanks again for your comments.

    Moggy, I think you could be right. The Wikipedia about ‘Z Batteries’ sounds a lot like the description on www.1940chronicle.com:

    “a ‘movable barrage of steel wire’... shot up from rocket guns based on boats and on land.”

    www.1940chronicle.com will soon have real video footage from 1940 to accompany some of its news stories. Do keep visiting and share your thoughts on this forum

  13. #13
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    Just taken a quick look at this & this immediately came to mind as I read this in our local paper recently
    http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/lasting_t...abeth_1_596498
    The description of her actions at Biggin Hill came across really vividly and thought maybe it should be included if she hasn't been already.
    I havn't taken a 'proper look yet but will when I return from work later!

    Brilliant work by the way!

    regards
    Martin

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by inkworm View Post
    I seem to recall them mentioned in a couple of books and that one allegedly brought a plane down, though this might have already received damage from the defences, don't have the books to hand at the moment annoyingly
    Tangmere1940 reminds me the title is The Hardest Day by Alfred Price. It's the book that focuses on a single day in the B of B. If I remember correctly, it had a line-drawing of the device.
    Last edited by Rogier; 23rd August 2010 at 17:51.
    "Never make a low approach on a cold front"

    Spitfires können nicht sowohl im Norden als auch im Süden zur gleichen Zeit sein

  15. #15
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    'The Hardest Day' by Alfred Price.
    Editor: 'Britain at War' Magazine

    A 'Key Publishing' product - Britain's Best Selling Military History Monthly

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangmere1940 View Post
    'The Hardest Day' by Alfred Price.
    That'll be the one, my copy is out on loan so couldn't remember the details, a fascinating read that book.
    Push enough pixels around and it'll look like an aeroplane profile.

  17. #17
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    That parachute and cable stuff was dumped over North Bedfordshire and us kids were involved in picking it up from the fields.

    The concern was that the sheep and cows might get tangled up in it. It was difficult to handle and required sharp cutters to cut the cable. The parachutes were a disappointment to us kids too, they were small and the chutes were opened with some of the same piano wire.

    We were told it was a test, but we did live on one of the Luftwaffe routes to Birmingham and Coventry.

    The cable was alleged to be going to be picked up, but the coils of it lay in one of the local market garden farms for years and it became a ready supply of wire to all and sundry, provided you could cut it!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by inkworm View Post
    That'll be the one, my copy is out on loan so couldn't remember the details, a fascinating read that book.
    fascinating account from several different perspectives of this form of defense in chapter two describing their use during an attack on Henley...caused a bit of an invasion scare as well as helping to take down a Dornier !

  19. #19
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    Brilliant site !

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadracer View Post
    Brilliant site !
    And friendly people
    "Never make a low approach on a cold front"

    Spitfires können nicht sowohl im Norden als auch im Süden zur gleichen Zeit sein

  21. #21
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    I wanted to leave a tribute message but the site locked up after 'submit message' button pressed. Good idea and tidy site though.

  22. #22
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    Leave a message of thanks to the Few

    Hi everyone,


    To mark Battle of Britain day we're giving people the opportunity to write a thankyou message to the RAF on the 1940chronicle site -


    Visit http://www.1940chronicle.com/day-of-action/ to write your message - see right hand side of the page: 'Show them we are proud'.


    The site will be open until Monday 20th.


    Thanks!

  23. #23
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    61

    PAC

    There was a "PAC" installed at the Vickers Factory at Brooklands as part of its defence during WW11 but after the air raids of September 1940, it was never used in anger. I believed there may have been one at RAF Kenley can anyone confirm this, and if this was ever used?.

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